Category: Uncategorized

Resource Spotlight: The Conference Board of Canada

Do you know that the library subscribes to the Conference Board of Canada’s e-library? That means we have access to a huge number of research reports and economic studies on subjects like risk management, taxation, socio-economic performance, governance, human resources management, organizational excellence, and Canadian and provincial economic trends. You’ll often find CBoC reports being referred to in the media… their e-library is where you can find the full report!

 

A sampling of recent reports and studies include:

  • Employee Engagement: Leveraging the Science to Inspire Great Performance / The Conference Board of Canada, 142 pages, July 13, 2016 Report by Todd Armstrong, Ruth Wright
  • The Conference Board Human Capital in Review™: Voices from Asia / The Conference Board, Inc., 15 pages, July 13, 2016
  • 25 Truths about Corporate Communications / The Conference Board, Inc., 18 pages, July 7, 2016
  • Addressing Employee Absences: A Look at Absence Management in Canadian Organizations / The Conference Board of Canada, 38 pages, June 28, 2016
    Briefing by Nicole Stewart
  • The Seven Pillars of Sustainability Leadership / The Conference Board, Inc., 82 pages, June 16, 2016
  • Improving Access to Canadian Health Care: The Role of Tax Policies / The Conference Board of Canada, 78 pages, May 26, 2016 Report by Greg Sutherland, Thy Dinh, Alexandru Dobrescu
  • Strengthening Symbiosis: International Business and Innovation / The Conference Board of Canada, 61 pages, May 12, 2016 Report by Michael Grant
  • DNA of Engagement: How Organizations Build and Sustain Highly Engaging Leaders / The Conference Board, Inc., 111 pages, March 21, 2016

Access the full e-library here: Conference Board of Canada e-Library

CBOC_BIL_WEB

Search, or browse by topic: Economic Trends, Organizational Performance, Public Policy

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Some Quick Business Cheat Sheets

The Library has just published some quick, one page cheat sheets to provide a starting place for some of the common research needs within Business.

These will help to identify what a particular type of resource is, where to find it and how it can be used for research.

They can be found on the main Guides by Course & Subject page for Business.

You can also take a look at them here:

Annual Reports

Case Studies

Company Profiles

Industry Codes (NAICS)

Industry Profiles

SWOT Analysis

International Business Culture

Globalization is a reality for most businesses. Whether it is accessing customers in a new market, developing an expansion plan to grow a business, or collaborating with other businesses, there are lots of things to consider when doing business with people from different cultures.

Understanding and incorporating knowledge of different cultural practices into your interactions with other people is a key element for success in international business. Thinking about different communication styles, how to dress, and body language are just as important as understanding customer needs and marketing strategies in another culture.

There are lots of freely available resources to help you get a feel for business practices in different cultures, here are a couple of quick examples:

Centre for Intercultural Learning: Country Insights

A great resource that provides both the Canadian perspective, and one from a person born in another country, for social and cultural norms that may be faced in that country’s business environment.

Kwintessential

Etiquette, customs and protocol guides on a number of different countries.

The library also has some great resources that can support your research into international cultural practices, communication and management:

RidingtheWaves Cultural Advantage

Cultural Differences in a Globalizing World Essential Concept of Cross Cultural Management

Please take a look at the Library guide for Multicultural Management for more resources.

 

New Infographic Guide

The Library has recently put out a new guide on infographics. You can use this guide to find out information on different tools to create infographics, design basics, types of infographics and evaluation strategies.

Infographics seem to be the medium of the moment these days. Businesses everywhere are turning to infographics to provide quick, visually stimulating information on brands, services, products and more. So why should businesses use infographics?

1. Visual appeal

Infographics grab attention. When designed well they can help cut through the information overload that people are faced with on a daily basis and ideally help target existing and new markets.

2. Shareable

Infographics are designed to be shared on a variety of platforms. Having content that is both visual and easily shareable gets your product, service or business attention.

3. Brand awareness

Infographics typically include, along with the primary message, logos, social media contacts and websites. This can greatly increase traffic and awareness.

To see some examples of infographics check out:

Here are a couple resources that the library has on infographics:

Infographics: The power of visual storytelling

The Power of Infographics

 

 

Social Media Impact on Business

It seems obvious that companies should and are spending time and money on social media, but determining what the impact and success of these tools are on businesses still remains a challenge. The most basic form of assessing social media impact is looking at hits, page views, and visits, which is not the most reliable way of determining the impact social media is having  (Moorman, 2015). In some ways the information businesses get from these types of metrics are more like “vanity metrics” (Madison, 2012). Vanity metrics are the pieces of data or information that look good on paper, such as saying how many likes you have, but don’t tell you anything meaningful about what social media is actually doing for your business.

There are several ways social media metrics can really have an impact on a business and their marketing and promotional strategies. Some of these include:

  • Using social media to compare how a brand compares with other competitors
  • Look at Shares rather than Likes to determine how deep your content is going
  • Look not just at how many new customers you have, but what your current customers are doing that impacts getting new customers  (Huggestien, 2014)

With new social media tools being formed so quickly and how instantaneously current tools are adapting to new users, technologies, and platforms, the depth of what social media metrics can tell you is significant.

For more information check out some of these library resources:

  • Search “social media metrics” in Octopus

BrilliantSocialMedia  UnderstandingSocialMediaTheSocialMediaBible

References:

Haggestuen, J. (2014, February 21). These Are The Metrics That Really Matter For Social Media [web log post]. Retrieved from http://www.businessinsider.com/the-social-roi-myth-3-2014-2

Madison, I. (2012, December 18). Why Your Social Media Metrics Are a Waste of Time [web log post]. Retrieved from https://hbr.org/2012/12/why-your-social-media-metrics

Moorman, C. (2015, January 18). Measuring the Impact of Social Media on Your Business [web log post]. Retrieved from http://www.forbes.com/sites/christinemoorman/2015/01/18/measuring-the-impact-of-social-media-on-your-business/

‘Tis the Time of Year: APA Citations

As we are coming in to the final stretch of assignments and course work I thought I would do a quick post reminding everyone of the APA citation resources available to you at the library and elsewhere. One of the unique challenges of APA citations for business sources is that a lot of the guides available for APA citations do not touch on some of the sources that are quite specific to business such as annual reports, company profiles and industry reports.

To help with that the library has created an APA citation guide specifically for business sources which you can check out here. On this guide you will find examples of how to cite both in text, and in your reference list, a variety of different business specific sources including annual reports, company profiles, and industry reports as well as how to properly insert a table, cite personal communications like non recorded interviews, and images.

One question that comes up a lot for APA citations is how to cite an entire website.

If you are citing an entire website it is fine to give the address of the site in text and not include it in the reference list.

Example: To learn more about how to cite things in APA take a look at the APA Style Blog (http://http://www.apastyle.org/).

SFU also has a great resource for citing business sources in APA, which you can find here.

Don’t forget the library APA guide that covers how to cite many other sources such as books, journal articles, YouTube videos, blogs and more.

One last thing to point out is that the Library News blog has recently put up a great post on how to make hanging indents without using tab, which is a key part of formatting your APA citations for your reference list. Check out that post here.

Still having trouble? Don’t worry! Come see as the reference desk Monday – Friday from 9-5, contact the library, or AskAway.

New Library Research Guides!

The new school year has officially started and we are diving right in to a new semester. With all of your new classes and assignments the library has created two new guides to help you with your course work.

The first is an APA Citation Guide for Business Sources. This guide goes over several resources that are unique to business and how to cite them in text or in your reference list.

The second is a Regional Data Guide for OC Locations. This guide aims to help you find the demographic, economic and some social information on the different regions that Okanagan College has a campus.

Don’t forget, there are also lots of Course and Subject Guides related to business that are also available to you.

If you have any questions or see something missing that you would like to add please contact Sajni Lacey, or drop by the research help desk.